Horn Trust

Growing a future and making a real change
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Make A Real Change In Someone’s Life

We work with people in the Horn of Africa to tackle poverty and the effects of the climate crisis by growing trees, improving people’s incomes, restoring and protecting land. Led by local people, our projects make sure trees thrive so they can provide food and incomes for today, as well as protect the environment for tomorrow.

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Where We Work

 

Horn Trust works in the Horn of Africa, where over 300 million people’s lives are affected by a drastic reduction in fertile land and the climate crisis.

That is why we are working with communities in Somalia, Somaliland, and Djibouti tackle it today and influence change for tomorrow.

We Also Work Within The UK

The principal objectives of our organisation is to provide practical support to disadvantaged refugees, asylum seekers, and vulnerable migrants with information, advice and guidance, as many can hardly write, read or speak English with any degree of fluency

Most find it hard to access services from mainstream or statutory service providers. We signpost them to access a range of support services from statutory and voluntary providers in Birmingham. We also organise a range of after-school activities, including revision homework in Maths, English Sciences and Computing, sports/football, Drama, Debate, and trips to educational sites and museums etc.

Another issue is destitution and homelessness faced by our clients. Our destitute clients include failed asylum seekers, irregular migrants with no recourse to public funds or people experiencing mental health issues, victims of domestic abuse etc. Most do not speak English and have a very limited understanding of the system.

We support our most vulnerable clients at a time when statutory agencies are reducing the already limited services to this marginalised group of people.

Homelessness is also a major issue experienced by many of our clients. The majority of our clients are not necessarily sleeping rough on the streets, but are without accommodation.

Once their claims are refused or removed, many asylum seekers within our community end up homeless or reduced to a life of street homelessness, sofa surfing with people from the same community or friends or family from one short-term stay to the next.

Some stay in accommodation provided by churches, mosques or temples, while many more stay in supported accommodation provided by voluntary organisations, such as Hope Destitution Housing, in Birmingham for many months. Homelessness, or short term accommodation, is a growing problem faced by our clients who are forced to rely on the exhaustible generosity of friends, their own community or destitution charities.